Young In Water Purification Systems

Water Purification Systems

aquaMAX-Basic-360

aquaMAX™ Basic 360

aquaMAX Basic 360 is the water purification system that produces Type III pure water from feed water.

aquaMAX-Ultra-370-Series

aquaMAX™ Ultra 370

The aquaMAX™ Ultra 370 Series – Ultra Water Purification System produces ultra-pure water in resistivity 18.2 MΩcm and inorganics reduction up to 99.99%(TOC level to <10 ppb).

aquapuri 363

aquapuri 363 water purification system produces Type Ⅱ and Type Ⅲ grade water directly from tap water without a water reservoir.

aquapuri 5 Series

The role of water purification systems is to remove impurities in the feed water(mainly tap water), prevent additional contamination and bacterial growth, and provide lab grade water that always meets the specified standards.

Applications

Primary Grade Water (Type 3)
Primary grade pure water (Type 3) uses carbon filtration and RO technology, and is the most cost-effective way to reduce water contaminants. Removing up to 99% of feed water contaminants, RO sees water flow from a less concentrated solution through a semipermeable membrane to a more concentrated solution. By applying external pressure to the more concentrated side, the osmotic flow is reversed, which forces the water through the membrane, and deposits the impurities on the surface. RO technology applies diffusion as opposed to separation, rejecting particles with a higher molecular weight. Feed water temperature, pressure, and the physical condition of the RO membrane are all parameters that affect rejection rates. Therefore, whilst rejection rates are variable, they tend to increase as the ionic charge and size of the molecule increases. For this reason, RO water can’t be specifically classified. RO water is most commonly used at the starting point for many applications in laboratories, including feeding glassware washing machines and autoclaves. It can also be used as a pre-treatment for ultrapure water systems, or anything that’s considered non-critical.
General Laboratory Grade Water (Type 2)
Primary grade pure water (Type 3) uses carbon filtration and RO technology, and is the most cost-effective way to reduce water contaminants. Removing up to 99% of feed water contaminants, RO sees water flow from a less concentrated solution through a semipermeable membrane to a more concentrated solution. By applying external pressure to the more concentrated side, the osmotic flow is reversed, which forces the water through the membrane, and deposits the impurities on the surface. RO technology applies diffusion as opposed to separation, rejecting particles with a higher molecular weight. Feed water temperature, pressure, and the physical condition of the RO membrane are all parameters that affect rejection rates. Therefore, whilst rejection rates are variable, they tend to increase as the ionic charge and size of the molecule increases. For this reason, RO water can’t be specifically classified. RO water is most commonly used at the starting point for many applications in laboratories, including feeding glassware washing machines and autoclaves. It can also be used as a pre-treatment for ultrapure water systems, or anything that’s considered non-critical.
Ultrapure Water (Type 1)
Primary grade pure water (Type 3) uses carbon filtration and RO technology, and is the most cost-effective way to reduce water contaminants. Removing up to 99% of feed water contaminants, RO sees water flow from a less concentrated solution through a semipermeable membrane to a more concentrated solution. By applying external pressure to the more concentrated side, the osmotic flow is reversed, which forces the water through the membrane, and deposits the impurities on the surface. RO technology applies diffusion as opposed to separation, rejecting particles with a higher molecular weight. Feed water temperature, pressure, and the physical condition of the RO membrane are all parameters that affect rejection rates. Therefore, whilst rejection rates are variable, they tend to increase as the ionic charge and size of the molecule increases. For this reason, RO water can’t be specifically classified. RO water is most commonly used at the starting point for many applications in laboratories, including feeding glassware washing machines and autoclaves. It can also be used as a pre-treatment for ultrapure water systems, or anything that’s considered non-critical.
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